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Lillian is really into baby dolls right now, and has even been caught making her baby sit on the potty.  So I thought I would make her doll a diaper.  I used Skip to my Lou’s doll diaper pattern found here.

Doll Diaper

This was super easy and quick to make and fit Lillian’s doll perfectly.

Doll Diaper

To make sure it was going to fit, I first took the pattern and “put it on” the doll.  It seemed to be a little big but close enough that I wasn’t going to take the time to adjust it.  Plus, I knew that the seam allowance would make it smaller.

Once I had the pieces cut out, I “tried it on” the doll again, just to make sure it was going to fit.

Doll Diaper

It fit fine, so off to sewing we go.  I kind of forgot (I guess you can’t kind of forget, so I forgot) to leave an opening to turn so I had to rip part of the seam out.  Before turning you need to cut corners and clip the curves.  Here is a great tip for clipping curves from Ashley at Make It and Love It.

Doll Diaper

Ashley also has a tutorial for making a doll diaper but did not have a pattern included.  She did top stitch, which I liked, so I top stitched as well.  This also makes closing the opening easier.

Doll Diaper

I sewed on the Velcro like you would do appliqué because I knew it wouldn’t come off from Lillian pulling and tugging all the time.  Also, I made the Velcro a little bigger on the main part of the diaper than I did on the flaps, that way Lillian didn’t have to attach it perfectly.

Doll Diaper

Try it on the doll and it fits!  Lillian loves this thing and puts it on the doll with a little help.  Takes the doll away, takes the diaper off and comes back to me to have me help put it on the doll again.  I highly suggest making a doll diaper for your child!

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Easter Weekend

Do you remember the Easter Basket that I made?  If not, here is the post on my experience, along with a link to the tutorial.

Easter Weekend

I wanted to share pictures of Lillian using the basket during her egg hunt in the backyard.

Easter Weekend

She got so excited about eggs being in the yard.

Easter Weekend

Even more than her first egg hunt the prior weekend.  I think the first egg hunt helped her to know what to do at home.

Easter Weekend

This time she knew exactly what to do with the eggs!

Easter Weekend

Lillian is still playing with the eggs and scattering them all over the house.  The eggs were a bigger hit than the basket that I made but that is ok with me.

I hope everyone had a great Easter and was able to spend time with their family.

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The last gift I made for our cousin’s children was a small tote bag for their daughter.  I used the same tutorial that I used for my tote bag, except I added a pocket to the inside and changed the dimensions so it was smaller.

Child's Tote Bag

I cut two 10 1/2 x 10 1/2 pieces from the outer fabric, lining, and interfacing for the main bag.  For the handles, I cut out 4 x 22 pieces from the lining and interfacing (you could also do two 4 x 11 pieces).  The pocket is a 5 x 10 piece of the outer fabric.

Child's Tote Bag

For this bag, I used Pellon 910 which is a nonwoven, sew-in interfacing for featherweight to mid weight fabrics.  I would have used Pellon 911FF like I did in my tote bag, but when I was buying the supplies they were out of it.  Luckily, I did have enough for the handle because I don’t think I would want to mess with a sew-in interfacing for a handle.

Child's Tote Bag

First, I made the handle and pocket.  For a pocket, all you need to do is fold it in half the long way with right sides facing.  Then, sew along the three open sides, but leave an opening in the bottom so you can turn it right side out.  Clip the corners, turn, iron, and topstitch the top (folded side).

Child's Tote Bag

To attach the pocket to the lining, all you need to do is pin it where you want the pocket to be and sew close to the edge on the sides and bottom.  Don’t forget to lock your stitch at the beginning and end so the pocket is secure.

Child's Tote Bag

I attached the interfacing to the outer fabric when sewing the two pieces together.  Instead of basting (a long stitch that holds multiple pieces together and is normally removed after permanently sewing them together) I just pinned the four layers together.

Child's Tote Bag

Since I used sew-in interfacing, I was able to trim the excess out of the seam allowance.  That way, when I turned it right side out there would be less bulk in the seams.

Child's Tote Bag

This project went well and I still really like these tote bags.  I still prefer the fusible interfacing, not only because it’s easier but because I did like the stiffness that it added to my other tote bag.

Child's Tote Bag

I also like the idea of having a pocket but I might line the pocket next time just so that there is a little extra support.  Also, this bag was more difficult to iron once finished since it was smaller.

Child's Tote Bag

Overall, I think the size of this bag is perfect for a young child and would make it again.

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Another thing I made for our cousin’s six month old son was a ribbon blanket.  I essentially followed this tutorial from Moda Bake Shop but looked at many other ones as well.

Ribbon Blanket

Due to the fabric that I was using, I ended up with odd sizes.  I cut each square 9 5/8” with 1/4” seam allowances, except for attaching the ribbons which I did at 1/8”.

I made both sides of the blanket with all four fabrics instead of a minky fabric on one side.

Ribbon Blanket

As you can see, I did not do the best job at matching up my fabrics, which caused issues when I stitched in the ditch at the end.  The reason I decided to stitch in the ditch is because I didn’t want to take the chance that the warm & natural (the batting that I used) would come loose and ball up after being washed.

Ribbon Blanket

I chose three different ribbons and cut them in three different sizes.  When attaching them, I just made sure to not have any of the same pattern next to each other, but the same size was fine.  And actually, I used one of each size and pattern on each half of a side.

Ribbon Blanket

I decided to pin each ribbon in place and then I sewed them on with about 1/8” seam allowance.  This may have caused more work for myself, but I felt that there would be less chance of having the ribbons shift this way.  I would do it this way again even if it is more work.

Ribbon Blanket

Here is one side of the blanket after attaching all of the ribbons.  I placed the ribbon fairly even (just eyed it) because well, that is how I am.  haha  Many other people can easily randomly attach ribbons, but I just don’t have it in me.  As often as I try to make things random I always end up with some sort of organization.

In other words, attach the ribbons however you are feeling at that time.  I think it can look fantastic either way!

Ribbon Blanket

I may not have needed to use safety pins to keep everything in place, but I thought I would give it a try.  Plus, I then wouldn’t have to worry about being poked by pins.

For the most part the ribbon went toward the inside, but there were a few that wanted to sneak out, so I just had to make sure to tuck them back in.  Otherwise, they would be on the inside of the blanket once it was completed.

Ribbon Blanket

After sewing everything together, I trimmed the warm & natural so there was less bulk.  Turned the blanket inside out, ironed, and topped stitched all the way around.

Ribbon Blanket

After topstitching, I decided that it would probably be best to quilt it in some way.  I didn’t feel like actual quilting would look the best, so that is why I decided to stitch in the ditch.  I am not 100% happy with how it turned out, but it has to do.  I wish that you weren’t able to see the stitching, but you are.

Ribbon Blanket

Overall, it’s an adorable ribbon blanket, but it could have turned out better if I had made sure my blocks were completely lined up.  Live and learn, right?

Ribbon Blanket

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Our cousin has a daughter a little over a year older than Lillian and they have been nice enough to give us a lot of clothes for Lillian.  I decided that I wanted to do something for them other than just a thank you card.  So I decided to make a few things for the kids.

My first project was a soft baby block for their six month old son.  It was kind of fun to finally pick out boy fabric.  I used the cloth blocks tutorial from Make It and Love It.

Soft Cube

This was a super fast project to make. I guess it did take a little while to cut out six squares but once that was done it took no time.  For me it seems to be easier to cut larger pieces of fabric than a bunch of smaller pieces.

Soft Cube

I used quilter’s cotton for four of the sides and then the other two are flannel. I wanted a slight texture difference but wasn’t sure if attaching different fabrics would be an issue.  The flannel was not an issue, at least not while sewing (hopefully not while playing either).

Soft Cube

There are other ways to make a cube but this way seemed to be the easiest.  I haven’t tried other ways so I can’t say that for sure.  For example, you could sew all six pieces together in a “T” shape like in this tutorial.

Soft Cube

Cutting out the notches helps the pieces to lay better when sewing them to the main part of the cube.  The two pieces below are my flannel pieces.

Soft Cube

I did have to learn how to do a ladder stitch before I could finish the block.  Here is a great PDF tutorial but it was a little easier for me to learn from a video so I recommend watching this one.

Soft Cube

The hardest part of the project was probably the ladder stitch.  I didn’t sew close enough together at first so I actually had to go over it again.  It’s still not perfect but it wasn’t too bad.

Overall, I think this would be a great beginner project.  Especially to learn how to ladder stitch and just to practice sewing in a straight line with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.