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Teacher Appreciation Gifts

Lillian is only 2 (well almost 2) but I still wanted to do something for her daycare teachers during teacher appreciation week.  Yes, this post is a little late!  Well, I decided on a gift card for each as well a little coin purse to go along with it.

The coin purse is the lil cutie pouch from Anna at Noodlehead, which I made for one of my first projects.  I wasn’t 100% sure on what the teachers like so I just used fabric that I had.  Hopefully they liked them!

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I accomplished my first skirt for Lillian and LOVE it!  It was Prudent Baby’s tutorial for a layer cake skirt.

Layer Cake Skirt

I bought the three fabrics at Hobby Lobby and it actually ended up that the green fabric didn’t really show up.  I guess that is what happens when you adjust a skirt to fit an almost 2 year old that only wears 18 month clothes.  I ended up using the green fabric for the diaper cover…post to come later.

Layer Cake Skirt

After some calculating based off of the tutorial, I used the following measurements, which are pretty close to what I would consider 18 month clothes (it’s for a little girl that needs the skirt to be about 8 inches long and with a waist measurement of 17 1/2 (if you use the 16 1/2 for the elastic)).

Elastic: 17 1/2 in but should have been 16 1/2 in (luckily it still fits!) I actually cut my elastic an inch shorter than the measurement of the waist because I do not overlap it.
Top Layer (green)”: (1) 3 1/4 x 42
Middle Layer (flowers): (1) 3 3/4 x 42 (1) 3 3/4 x 21
Bottom Layer (circles): (2) 4 3/4 x 42
The hem was sewn at 3/8 in and I basted at 1/4 in but my needle was at position 4 which makes it a little less and then I sewed the layers together at 3/8.

Layer Cake Skirt

I left the selvage edge and just made sure to sew in far enough so that it did not show on the outside.  This way, I had less edge stitching, which is fantastic since I don’t have a serger.

Layer Cake Skirt

Basting…well, it’s a pain, actually, it’s not the basting that is a pain, but the gathering.  It seemed to take forever to get the layer equal to the length of the layer above it.  But, it’s well worth the time, because the skirt is adorable!

Layer Cake Skirt

At first it was a little weird to sew the two pieces together because I have never sewn two pieces together that weren’t completely flat.  You don’t need to feel like it has to be perfect because it will look fantastic on the ride side of the fabric anyway.

Layer Cake Skirt

As I mentioned above, I don’t have a serger, but I do have an overlock foot.  This foot is what I used to finish the edges.  I know that I could just do a zigzag stitch but with the overlock foot it pretty much looks the same as it would if it were serged.  It takes awhile to finish the edge this way, but I think it’s worth it.  There is less room for fraying.

Layer Cake Skirt

Here is the skirt before prepping for the elastic.

Layer Cake Skirt

Again, as I mentioned above, I cut my elastic an inch shorter than I need it.  I then attach each end to a piece of cotton fabric.  This way, the elastic lays completely flat but with it attached to the cotton it will still remain in place as if it were a complete circle.

Layer Cake Skirt

Lillian let me put the skirt on her right away (which is an improvement over the drawstring bag that I made) and decided that it was snack time.

Layer Cake Skirt

This skirt, even though it looks complicating, is actually very easy to make.  If you want to make it and need help figuring out the measurements for your little girl, let me know and I will try to help out.

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Lillian is really into baby dolls right now, and has even been caught making her baby sit on the potty.  So I thought I would make her doll a diaper.  I used Skip to my Lou’s doll diaper pattern found here.

Doll Diaper

This was super easy and quick to make and fit Lillian’s doll perfectly.

Doll Diaper

To make sure it was going to fit, I first took the pattern and “put it on” the doll.  It seemed to be a little big but close enough that I wasn’t going to take the time to adjust it.  Plus, I knew that the seam allowance would make it smaller.

Once I had the pieces cut out, I “tried it on” the doll again, just to make sure it was going to fit.

Doll Diaper

It fit fine, so off to sewing we go.  I kind of forgot (I guess you can’t kind of forget, so I forgot) to leave an opening to turn so I had to rip part of the seam out.  Before turning you need to cut corners and clip the curves.  Here is a great tip for clipping curves from Ashley at Make It and Love It.

Doll Diaper

Ashley also has a tutorial for making a doll diaper but did not have a pattern included.  She did top stitch, which I liked, so I top stitched as well.  This also makes closing the opening easier.

Doll Diaper

I sewed on the Velcro like you would do appliqué because I knew it wouldn’t come off from Lillian pulling and tugging all the time.  Also, I made the Velcro a little bigger on the main part of the diaper than I did on the flaps, that way Lillian didn’t have to attach it perfectly.

Doll Diaper

Try it on the doll and it fits!  Lillian loves this thing and puts it on the doll with a little help.  Takes the doll away, takes the diaper off and comes back to me to have me help put it on the doll again.  I highly suggest making a doll diaper for your child!

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Easter Weekend

Do you remember the Easter Basket that I made?  If not, here is the post on my experience, along with a link to the tutorial.

Easter Weekend

I wanted to share pictures of Lillian using the basket during her egg hunt in the backyard.

Easter Weekend

She got so excited about eggs being in the yard.

Easter Weekend

Even more than her first egg hunt the prior weekend.  I think the first egg hunt helped her to know what to do at home.

Easter Weekend

This time she knew exactly what to do with the eggs!

Easter Weekend

Lillian is still playing with the eggs and scattering them all over the house.  The eggs were a bigger hit than the basket that I made but that is ok with me.

I hope everyone had a great Easter and was able to spend time with their family.

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The last gift I made for our cousin’s children was a small tote bag for their daughter.  I used the same tutorial that I used for my tote bag, except I added a pocket to the inside and changed the dimensions so it was smaller.

Child's Tote Bag

I cut two 10 1/2 x 10 1/2 pieces from the outer fabric, lining, and interfacing for the main bag.  For the handles, I cut out 4 x 22 pieces from the lining and interfacing (you could also do two 4 x 11 pieces).  The pocket is a 5 x 10 piece of the outer fabric.

Child's Tote Bag

For this bag, I used Pellon 910 which is a nonwoven, sew-in interfacing for featherweight to mid weight fabrics.  I would have used Pellon 911FF like I did in my tote bag, but when I was buying the supplies they were out of it.  Luckily, I did have enough for the handle because I don’t think I would want to mess with a sew-in interfacing for a handle.

Child's Tote Bag

First, I made the handle and pocket.  For a pocket, all you need to do is fold it in half the long way with right sides facing.  Then, sew along the three open sides, but leave an opening in the bottom so you can turn it right side out.  Clip the corners, turn, iron, and topstitch the top (folded side).

Child's Tote Bag

To attach the pocket to the lining, all you need to do is pin it where you want the pocket to be and sew close to the edge on the sides and bottom.  Don’t forget to lock your stitch at the beginning and end so the pocket is secure.

Child's Tote Bag

I attached the interfacing to the outer fabric when sewing the two pieces together.  Instead of basting (a long stitch that holds multiple pieces together and is normally removed after permanently sewing them together) I just pinned the four layers together.

Child's Tote Bag

Since I used sew-in interfacing, I was able to trim the excess out of the seam allowance.  That way, when I turned it right side out there would be less bulk in the seams.

Child's Tote Bag

This project went well and I still really like these tote bags.  I still prefer the fusible interfacing, not only because it’s easier but because I did like the stiffness that it added to my other tote bag.

Child's Tote Bag

I also like the idea of having a pocket but I might line the pocket next time just so that there is a little extra support.  Also, this bag was more difficult to iron once finished since it was smaller.

Child's Tote Bag

Overall, I think the size of this bag is perfect for a young child and would make it again.